Archive for July, 2020

The Next Generation Hardware

July 10, 2020

hardware

FountainBlue’s July 10 VIP roundtable was on the topic of ‘Next Generation Hardware’, conducted online with introductory remarks provided by AMD.

We were fortunate to have a diverse range of executives in attendance who shared a wide range of perspectives around the Next Generation of Hardware.

Chips have been powering not just servers, laptops and devices, but now progressively more the Cloud, Gaming, Automotive, AI/ML which requires intensive acceleration of performance, and response times, while also respecting the privacy and security of users.

The hardware – including CPUs, GPUs, Tensor Cores, Digital Signal processing devices, IoT devices – facilitates the generation of the data whereas the software ensures that the right data is captured to drive the application, to report and measure on specific outcomes, to enabled data-based decision-making.

Below is advice from our esteemed hardware executives.

  • As performance and response times as safety-critical – particularly in auto and health-related solutions – OR business-critical – particularly in manufacturing and production – the physical design of all the hardware involved in each solution must be scalable and flexible, working seamlessly with the software.
  • The hardware helps to collect the data, but must be designed so that AI and ML integrated into the software can efficiently collect the relevant data, and provide real-time information to relevant stakeholders.
  • The hardware must be modular enough to work with other hardware units, small enough to fit within a device, powerful enough to meet the needs of the customer, durable enough to withstand intensive usage, and efficient enough to work with minimal power.
    • As an example, the hardware must become even smaller and more portable, so the functionality is provided for demanding customers, in small form factors such as the phones which fit in our pockets!
  • IoT devices will increasingly need to do some processing on the edge, especially when performance is critical. This is the ‘Empowered Edge’.
  • Sort the data in terms of what’s most relevant, most urgent and to what audience, and give actionable real-time reports which would help them make critical decisions.
  • Design the hardware to keep up with the explosion of data, and design it to be flexible enough to work with the software. 

Below are examples of specific enterprise use cases involving augmented reality hardware:

  • Remote assistance, so that the expert can support the user to do everything from monitor or fix or manage equipment or devices from a distant location
  • Guided Workflow, which supports the adoption of efficient processes
  • Digital Collaboration on design and implementation

Below are examples of proactive management solutions related to the production of hardware.

  • Predictive Maintenance to proactively manage when equipment needs parts or service
  • Proactive management of Supply chain to ensure no one part is a limiting factor for production

Below are some thoughts about future trends and things to think about:

  • Much as there has been a consolidation of architectures and GPUs and DSPs, there will also be a consolidation of AI accelerators. Create a software ecosystem to support the AI accelerator, to increase the likelihood of becoming a hardware standard.
  • Leverage biological constructs to design solutions which can store and process immense amounts of data.
  • Hardware does everything from managing the batteries on your phone to navigating home. How can the hardware work with the software to increase performance and accuracy? to do it with a smaller, more powerful footprint? to integrate with other functionality?
  • The Work-From-Home phenomena resulting from the pandemic is exacerbating the adoption of laptop and smartphone hardware innovations as well. With everyone working (or not working) from home, the volume of data is amplified, the adoption of unstructured video data is magnified, and the demand for immediate and accurate response and support is urgent. 
    • What does this mean for chip designers, manufacturers, retailers, distributors? What kinds of innovations would suit this immense and quickly growing WFH user base?
    • What does this mean for the executive who wants to maximize operational and minimize IT issues, while addressing privacy, access and security issues?

We close with some provocative thoughts which might not be too far in the future.

  • What’s next after the smart phone?
  • How do we create an electronic mask for protection?
  • How do we sanitize our clothing between washes?
  • How can we leverage Lidar to better navigate our surroundings?
  • How do we make brain computing a reality?

The pendulum swings back and forth between the hardware and the software, and both will always be important. 

Say What You Mean, Mean What You Say

July 10, 2020

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FountainBlue’s July 10 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘Say What You Mean, Mean What You Say’, hosted online by Samsung.

Our panelists represented a wide range of backgrounds and perspectives, companies and roles. But they whole-heartedly agreed that saying what you mean, and meaning what you say is the essence of leadership. Below is a summary of their best practices for ‘saying what you mean’:

  • Build relationships of trust, based on a history of delivering what was promised.
  • Be authentic and open, flexible, curious and good natured, as often as you can, even when you don’t feel like it.
  • Always be respectful in how you communicate to others, how you treat others.
  • If you see something (wrong), do something. But do it in a way which is respectful of others, which is more inquisitive than commanding, more polite than dictatorial. 
  • Each conversation has the potential to raise the bar for the participating individuals and for the team.
  • Speak to the why, the what and the how, so that you can best build alignment.
  • Focus on the data and the facts and try not to get emotional even when your buttons are pushed.
  • Practice active listening so that the other parties feel heard.
  • Remember that the relationship is more important than a project or mistake or program.
  • Clearly communicate the goal and timeline in your meetings, and follow the agenda.
  • Speak succinctly and clearly.
  • Be persistent and patient in your communication, especially when change needs to happen.
  • Know your audience and their motivation.
  • Agree on and measure your progress.
  • Be curious about the perspective of others, and aligned on a starting point.
  • Have a clear call to action, in alignment with the common purpose.

Below are some best practices for meaning what you say.

  • Be clear on your communication and consistent with your follow-through to build that reputation as a competent and trustworthy professional. 
  • Speak to consequences for individuals, team, company, product if something isn’t delivered.
  • Be known for someone who follows through.
  • Be proactive is you need to change what you said in the past, and transparent about communicating why there had to be a change.
  • Don’t tolerate or participate in ‘blame games’, but do mean what you say and take positive measures to demonstrate that.

Leadership is often not easy but always worthwhile, even if the rewards aren’t either immediate or apparent.

Recommended resource: Mandel Communications | Course List and Reviews, https://directory.trainingindustry.com/training

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FountainBlue’s July 10 When She Speaks event on the topic of ‘Say What You Mean, Mean What You Say’. Please join me in thanking our hosts at Samsung, and our esteemed panelists: 

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue
  • Panelist Cara Bilinski, Executive Director, IT PMO, Maxim
  • Panelist Tracy Meersman, Director Sales Enablement, Skybox Security
  • Panelist Suchitra Narayen, VP Commercial Legal, Informatica 
  • Panelist Priya Poolavari, Director of Engineering, Core Data Platform / Data Intelligence, Samsung  

What One Thing Can We Do to Support Black Professionals?

July 1, 2020
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Reference: McKinsey/LeanIn 2018 Report and Findings

In this time of civil unrest, of economic insecurity, of medical uncertainty, it is my hope that together, we can build a more Diverse, more Empowered and more Engaged community, focused on increasing the number of recruited, retained and promoted professionals of all colors, for the short term, and in the long term. 

The McKinsey and LeanIn 2018 report on the numbers of men and women of color across the career journey is troubling, and the pandemic, the economic crisis, the civil unrest will further impede the progress on a goal of having more men and women of color recruited, developed, retained and promoted.

I asked Black professionals in the FountainBlue network what one thing can we as non-Blacks do to positively impact our progress. Below are their responses.

Be Informed.

  • Educate yourself – the onus is on YOU to educate yourself, don’t count on others to do it for you.
  • Be discerning about what you read and look for the TRUTH.
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  • Be Curious. Be a Generous Listener with an Open Mind.
  • Listen and feel to their stories of trials and challenges.

Have Acceptance and Fortitude.

  • Accept that you must also change your way of thinking, your habits, your mis-perceptions, your biases, conscious or otherwise.
  • Accept that you will make mistakes and deviate from the course. Be courageous and humble enough to apologize, correct, and carry on. 

Prepare to feel deeply.

  • Be willing to feel uncomfortable.
  • Discrimination runs deep and wide. The level of pervasive discrimination is shameful. Our unintentional compliance with any discrimination can be troubling.
  • Be courageous enough to feel deeply. It’s OK to be sad, but do not feel pity.
  • Be willing to share your uncomfortable stories, feelings and topics with others.
  • Reflect: When you have a “gut” reaction or immediate reaction that is one of: distaste, anger, fear, aversion, agreement to a negative comment or action aimed at a Black person because of what that person is: wearing, saying (e.g. opinion, vernacular, vocal variety, passion, etc.), doing, located. 

  • STOP – REFLECT. Ask yourself why your reaction was so automatic. Was it a personal experience or “a knowing.” Often times, we can’t explain embedded or systemic racism. We just “know” it’s right, because it has been so carefully trained into us from a young age.

Provide Proactive Support.

  • Make a stand for your brothers and sisters, whether or not they are present, whether or not they know you’re doing it.
  • Collaborate with others to communicate a ‘You Can Too’ mindset to our Black youths. Help them to also reach for stars.
  • Intentionally hire more diverse candidates and help them to succeed.
  • Hire on merit, not for looks.
  • Advocate for others. Continue to call out racism and bigotry when you witness it and through social media.
  • Have the grace to offer opportunity rather than just charity, although charity is also appreciated.

Seize the Opportunity.

  • Embrace the concept that diversity is part of a Growth Mindset – something that helps us all.
  • Provide a Platform so that Blacks may speak. Don’t speak on their behalf.
  • Organize group talks to discuss race, social injustices and the role privilege plays in the fight for racial justice. 

Resources and Recommendations:

As a follow-up to this blog, FountainBlue will launch a ‘You Can Too‘, to provide up to 20 Summer Scholarships for youths and young professionals to attend of our semi-monthly Front Line Managers Online programs from July-September, and including a fifteen minute online coaching session once a month for three months. To apply for the summer scholarship for our ‘You Can Too’ program, visit https://forms.gle/RaGBoRqquiFgngNW9.  

This month, we will connect with HR leaders interested in Embracing Diversity, Facilitating Empowerment, Measuring Engagement, so our August blog will feature best practices for doing each. E-mail me if you would like to weigh in on the conversation.

Coming together and making a stand for diversity and justice would not only be a testament to our courageous, proactive and positive natures, our righteous and resilient spirits as leaders and as human beings, it would also increase our likelihood of connecting deeply with each other, and of increasing the likelihood of success.