DevOps Opportunities and Challenges

February 15, 2020 by

DevOps

FountainBlue’s February 14 VIP roundtable, on the topic of ‘DevOps Opportunities and Challenges’. Thank you also to our gracious host at Comcast. Below are notes from the conversation.  

We were fortunate to have a diverse range of executives in attendance who worked in devops in many different ways. Collectively, they defined ‘devops’ in the following way:

  • tools and processes designed to empower and enable developers to better serve internal and external customers;
  • systems and solutions intended to help developers integrate solutions end-to-end, rather than handing off projects to other parties;
  • integrated solutions and processes which help individuals, teams, and leaders better respond to a fast-moving, highly-demanding customer base;
  • systems designed to facilitate the communication and coordination, encourage the collaboration between silos of stakeholders.

Our executives agreed that the many elements of devops solutions are integral to the success of ventures large and small, and that individuals and companies who don’t acknowledge and accept this fact will be left behind.

Below are thoughts on how best to support the adoption of devops principles.

  • Consider the needs of all stakeholders in designing solutions.
  • Align all stakeholders behind a corporate vision, a common goal.
  • Hold everyone accountable for the success of a project, rather than on 
  • Blur the line on role definition, boundaries between what you do and what others do. Focus on what we do together, what success together looks like, how to align behind a common mission/vision/milestone.
  • Help people plan from the top down, deliver from the bottom up.
  • Clear, transparent communication from the top-down, from the bottom up is critical.
  • Not everyone will embrace the new way of doing business with devops principles. 
  • Collaboratively design a process which delivers measured results. From there, you can decide on which tools and which people can help deliver those results.
  • Find and recruit the passionate, the talented, the open, the hungry and empower them to succeed.
  • Embrace a culture of accountability. Erase a culture of entitlement. 
  • Executive sponsorship and buy-in are essential to encourage a shift to a more open, more devops-oriented culture.
  • Consider Security and Scalability issues in designing extensible devops solutions.

We close with some key comments:

  • Partnerships within and across the company are key to all devops initiatives.
  • Devops leaders and innovators are resourceful, action-oriented and results-focused.

Thank you again for taking the time to join us and share your perspective and information. 

One Plus One Makes Eleven

February 15, 2020 by

OnePlusOnePanelFountainBlue’s February 13 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘One Plus One Makes Eleven’. This month’s inspiring panel of leaders came from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences, but they had much in common.

  • They are clear and inspiring communicators who are both humble and confident.
  • They have navigated some challenging waters, and learned from both their successes and their challenges.
  • They continue to push the envelop, holding the bar higher for themselves and for all those they work with.

They also agreed on many things.

  • Empowering the people and the team is a critical management and leadership skill. 
  • The only way for individuals and teams to scale is to include a broader, more diverse team members.
  • It’s not always easy to integrate someone into a team, but it’s often worth the effort to try. Build rapport with each team member.

They also shared advice on how to get teams to be more innovative.

  • Create and nurture a culture which rewards failure, which invites courage.
  • Invite the multipliers to join the team. 
  • Inspire and engage the right people to join and stay. 
  • Embrace a collaboration mind set – 
  • Be ever ready to answer the questions: how are we better together? how are we making a difference?
  • Celebrate the wins.
  • Err on the side of inclusivity.
  • Decide for yourself what types of people would ‘push your buttons’. Find out how to best manage yourself, and best work with people who might be toxic or difficult under specific circumstances.
  • Be customer-oriented and motivate the team to also focus on the customer.
  • Be metrics/data-based, especially when emotions run high.

We close by challenging everyone to be the leader, be the change. Never settle into complacency. Celebrate successes, but then be passionate about what’s next.


FountainBlue’s February 13 When She Speaks event on the topic of ‘One Plus One Makes Eleven’. Please join me in thanking our panelists and our hosts at Citrix.

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue
  • Panelist Indira Joshi, Director of Technical Marketing, Emerging Memory Solutions, Micron Technology
  • Panelist Shikha Mittal, Director, Product Management & Strategy, VMware
  • Panelist Marissa Schmidt, Senior Director of Product Management, CITRIX

With Each Challenge Comes Opportunity

January 24, 2020 by

AllAboard

We world-changers believe that ‘with each challenge comes opportunity’. In fact, it’s too overwhelming to be a world-changer if we take the business, sustainability, equality challenges too much to heart.

Consider the challenge of getting more diversity, more empowerment and more engagement within teams and companies and industries. (This post will not cover why this needs to happen or what the benefits are should it happen. Read further if you’d like to help make it happen.)

To get ‘All Aboard’ in tackling this challenge, we must all do the following:

  1. Collect and Disseminate the Research on the Value of Diversity on Teams, in Companies, on Boards.
    • The data is out there. Compiling it and reporting on it will help drive momentum, facilitate change.
  2. Build a Network of like-minded people, invested through thoughts, words and actions.
    • Speak up and align thoughts, words and actions with those who also want to make a difference and move the needle forward.
  3. Expand the Candidate Base – focus on the children.
    • Focus on initiatives which would support the children. Help them think, dream, plan for a more open, more inclusive, more diverse future. Inspire, empower and engage them.
  4. Expand the Candidate Base – focus on corporate professionals.
    • Help our young professionals succeed where they are now, and rise among the ranks and reach for new heights. Their success would influence all they touch.
  5. Welcome Creative and Entrepreneurial Representatives.
    • Be open, warm and accepting of those who can’t/won’t ‘draw within the lines’. In thinking differently, these creatives, these entrepreneurs also hold a piece of the puzzle.
  6. Challenge the Mindsets of Leaders and Innovators.
    • Often, ‘what got you here won’t get you to that next level’. A change in mind-set, a broader, more open perspective, a more inclusive network may help re-set and expand expectations and achievements. 
  7. Connect People, Networks and Communities.
    • The more I learn, the more I grow, the more I see us all as ONE. Finding intersects which bring greater inclusion, broader perspectives, shared objectives will help each of us work collaboratively to serve as all.
  8. Choose a Cause. Make a Stand.
    • We are in crisis mode. Don’t wait for an invitation to serve. We can all be knighted to serve the many opportunities to make a difference.
  9. Communicate, Coordinate, Engage around a Cause.
    • Which specific problems will you tackle? Keep us posted on the what, the how, the who.
  10. The Time is NOW. The Baton is Yours.
    • How will YOU lead through this crisis? 

Healthcare Opportunities and Challenges

January 21, 2020 by

Healthcare

FountainBlue’s January 17 VIP roundtable was on the topic of ‘Healthcare Opportunities and Challenges’. Thank you also to our gracious host at Roche. Below are notes from the conversation.  

We had an outstanding group of diverse executives, all representing the breadth and depth of healthcare – from medical equipment and medical supplies and devices, to healthcare services and providers, to the biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, and miscellaneous scientific and professional services related to the curative, preventive, rehabilitative, and palliative care of patients of every ilk.

Through the variance of perspectives, our healthcare executives agreed the data revolution continues and is impacting healthcare in many ways, even enabling personalized medicine. For example, the sheer volume of knowledge is overwhelming and the accumulation of knowledge continues to escalate. In fact, accumulated medical knowledge took 50 years to double, but today, it takes 73 days.  

What becomes critical then is figuring out what data is relevant to whom for what purpose and how that relevant data will drive better decision-making for patients, practitioners, providers, vendors, care-givers, insurers, etc. 

Below are some opportunities highlighted by our executives:

  • Leverage the data to optimize diagnosis, decision-making, and treatment easier, more collaborative, more robust, more dynamic.
  • Embrace technological solutions to age-old health challenges.
  • Help institutions and providers leverage technology to be more effective and more efficient.
  • Provide integrated hardware and software solutions which help patients optimize their own health, manage their own conditions.
  • Efficiently provide comprehensive, individualized programs which are scalable and customizable, yet also cost-effective to manage and run.
  • Serve the proactive, informed patient/consumer who will increasingly demand more personalized services.
  • Offer technology solutions which enabled integrated health and wellness.
  • Create solutions which help hospitals integrate legacy data and hardware, while also improving processes and providing more digital functionality.
  • Consider opportunities around remote monitoring for the aging population, leveraging mobile devices and sensors.
  • Optimize logistics, delivery, fulfillment and retail support for the highly-regulated healthcare market.
  • Integrate today’s hot technologies into comprehensive healthcare applications: AI/ML, Edge Computing, IoT, Robotics, Deep Fake, 3D modeling, AR/VR…

A major theme in the discussion is that collaboration across leaders, organizations, nations, and industries is key.

  • Corporations continue to make build/buy/partner decisions with start-ups targeting specific niche markets.
  • The sharing of data, if managed well to respect privacy and access, can benefit all stakeholders.
  • Create platforms which would allow multiple stakeholders to collaborate in the service of patients, in the search for cures.
  • Industry leaders and technologists and advocacy groups need to partner with policymakers to improve the evaluation process, to better serve patients.
  • Genius ideas can come from anywhere – providing the data and information will help more geniuses step forward.

The bottom line is that no matter where we sit at the table, as a patient, as a technologist, as a provider, we are all in charge of our own health. Empowering all stakeholders with tools, resources and information will help us all make better healthcare choices.

A Seat at the Table

January 20, 2020 by

SeatAtTablePanelFountainBlue’s January 18 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘A Seat at the Table’.  Although this month’s panelists had a wide range of styles, perspectives and backgrounds, they have each certainly earned their seats at the table. Below is a compilation of their advice on how we could each also earn the respect, influence and resources needed to make a strategic and tactical impact at work and in life.

  • Be Brave.
    • If you want to make a difference and experience something different than what you’ve experienced to date, be courageous in making well-thought-out, uncomfortable choices.
  • Be Calm.
    • Manage your own emotions so that you can have more influence. When emotions run high, try to assume positive intent and understand the motivations and actions of people who are making you upset. 
  • Be Prepared.
    • Think strategically and tactically about what you’d like to accomplish and why, who can help make it happen, how it could happen, what success looks like, etc. 
  • Be Authentic.
    • Be fully and genuinely and openly authentic, truthful, compassionate and human. This is especially true through tough circumstances.
  • Be Connected.
    • Grow your personal and professional network to include a wider and broader swath of people.  
  • Be Empathetic.
    • Be open and empathetic, more curious than judgmental about people who are not-like-you. 
  • Be Collaborative.
    • Partner and work with like-minded people to achieve results which benefit all.
  • Be Charming.
    • Honey attracts flies better than vinegar. Never underestimate the power of charm. 
  • Be Strategic.
    • When making decisions, consider the why, the what, the who, the how and achieve those long-term and short term goals. 
  • Be Effective.
    • Know what success looks like and measure and report on your progress along the way, engaging all stakeholders.
  • Be Creative.
    • Embrace your ability to think outside the box. Welcome others to also voice diverse perspectives.
  • Be Compassionate.
    • Be gentle with yourself and others. We are all one, on an imperfect journey to finding our greater selves.
  • Be Positive.
    • Manage your self-talk and your energy to think and act positively.

The bottom line is that we can each earn a seat at the table, no matter what our background, role, education, etc., If you choose to have a seat at the table, first ask yourself WHY you’d like to do it, WHAT you’d like to influence first, WHO can help you to do so, and WHAT success would look like.

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FountainBlue’s January 18 When She Speaks event on the topic of ‘A Seat at the Table’. Please join me in thanking our panelists and our hosts at TechLAB.

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue
  • Panelist Coco Brown, Founder and CEO, The Athena Alliance
  • Panelist Barbara Massa, Executive Vice President, People & Places, FireEye
  • Panelist Nivedita Ojha, Senior Director – Product Management, Edge Devices & Cloud, Mobile, SaaS, Citrix
  • Panelist Sonya Pelia, CMO, Cira Apps Ltd; Board Member, How Women Lead
  • Panelist Ronit Polak, VP Quality Assurance, Palo Alto Networks

Men Who Open Doors

December 20, 2019 by

MenOpenDoors.jpg

FountainBlue’s December 13 When She Speaks event was on the topic of Men Who Open Doors.  This month’s panelists represented a wide range of companies, backgrounds and roles, but they had much in common which made them great sponsors.

  • They consistently and strategically sponsor the women in their organization because they believe in the business, professional and personal benefits for doing so
  • They have success stories which show how sponsorship has benefited individuals, teams, and organizations.
  • They support and espouse a culture of inclusive beyond the people they can personally sponsor.

Below is advice they shared about how to sponsor a promising staff member.

  • Doing the right thing by someone and supporting their advancement is also good for your culture, your product, your company.
  • Be an empathetic and proactive listener. 
  • Help someone clarify their passion, and create a path to work on something of interest to her/him.
  • Have a merit-based view of the world.
  • See others without the filter of judgment. 
  • Learn from everyone, no matter what their role is, what their organization is.
  • Invite diverse perspectives to support everything from product development to decision-making, from hiring to marketing.
  • Encourage people to stop complaining and start doing something. Empower them to succeed.
  • Allow access to key leaders and customers so that they can see the larger perspective. 
  • Give them opportunities to prove themselves, to shine and thrive.
  • Help people gain the self confidence to reach beyond their comfort zone.

Below is advice for people who are seeking sponsors.

  • Be strategic about what you’re looking for, who can help you, how she/he can help you.
  • Know that not all sponsors are the right ones for you, and even that not all sponsors are good sponsors.
  • Be clear on your interests and your passion, and how these things can benefit the product, the group, the organization.
  • Be willing to work hard, to learn to think, speak and act differently.
  • Embrace feedback and input.
  • Be open minded about available options.

Below is advice on how we can help each other move the needle forward.

  • Help and support others, even if it’s not your job to do so.
  • Choose to do the right thing, and help others to do the same.
  • Have an abundance mindset – the more you help someone else – even if that person is not directly related to you – the more you help everyone.
  • Help someone find his or her voice.
  • Make a stand for someone whose not acknowledged.
  • Defend someone from the games others are playing to undermine her/him.

The bottom line with these sponsors is that they whole-heartedly believe that together with a more diverse, more inclusive team, we are ALL better off, in the short term and for the long term.


Please join me in thanking our panelists and our hosts at Texas Instruments.

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue; Director, Vonzos Partners
  • Panelist Dr. Benjamin Cook, Sr. Director, Nanotechnology – Kilby Labs, CTO Organization, Texas Instruments
  • Panelist JD Dillon, Vice President of Marketing, Enphase Energy
  • Panelist Martin Jessen, VP Learning Solutions North America, Schneider Electric
  • Panelist Mike Snell, Vice President of Operations, Global Operations, Lam Research
  • Panelist Jon Woolvine, Distinguished Engineer, Director Information Technology, Cisco 
  • with opening remarks provided by Rajni Dharmarajan, Product line General Manager, Texas Instruments

Thoughts on Spirituality

December 8, 2019 by

Spirituality

My thoughts on spirituality, Linda Holroyd, December 8, 2019

The end of the year, and the start of the new year, is a time of reflection. I find myself thinking about Spirituality. I’m sharing my thoughts below.

Spirituality is about the Head, the Heart and the Hands. 

From the Head, we can read our history books and study religions and religious beliefs and traditions. It helps us understand how people think, speak and act, and helps us understand what spirituality means for people who are not like ourselves. Spiritual growth for the head is about reading, researching, learning and integrating information about what’s important to others.

From the Heart, spirituality is about how we touch people emotionally, and how people touch each other. The goal is to bring peace, love, forgiveness, all these good things to human relations, especially when there have been breaches between people, conflict between groups. Thus, spiritual growth from the heart is about learning to better love, better accept each other as one, no matter how different we are from each other.

From the Hands, spirituality is about doing things great and small which would bring together people who are different from each other. Whether it’s about attending meetings together, resolving conflicts with each other, attending a party or a service or a wedding, the bringing together of people who are naturally different is inherently a spiritual task. The people who bring together others are priests, managers, leaders, facilitators. We owe them a great debt.

It could stop here, but it doesn’t.

Spirituality transcends what we as humans can understand. Far overshadowing our view of the head, the heart and the hands is a world beyond our ability to comprehend, control or even imagine. It’s expressed in the big things that make us feel small: 

  • in nature:
    • when we witness the miracles of birth, growth and death,
    • when we witness the majesty of both sunsets and hailstorms,
    • when we witness the terror of earthquakes and typhoons;
  • in people when the strength of the human spirit overcomes overwhelming odds; 
  • in the soul-stirring expressions found in art, music, dance, words;
  • in the wealth of data which helps us understand how small our world is, how insignificant we each are.

For me, it’s always been overwhelming to consider that level of spirituality. I think, ‘if we are so small and insignificant, then nothing we do matters’. Right?

I’ve always gone forward anyway, doing the small things within my power to support the head, heart, and hands of spiritual growth for myself and for those I may touch. As small and as un-pure are they sometimes are, I’d like to think that my thoughts, my words, my actions matter, for my own spiritual development, and for that of those around me.

In closing, I’d like to share a Hindu greeting – Namaste – “May our minds and hearts come together”. 

Smart Cities, Smart Buildings

December 8, 2019 by

SmartCities

FountainBlue’s December 6 VIP roundtable was on the topic of ‘Smart Cities, Smart Buildings’. Thank you also to our gracious host at Hyundai. Below are notes from the conversation.  

As usual, our executives in attendance for this month’s roundtable represented a wide breadth of companies, industries, experience and perspectives. They shared many common thoughts around this month’s topic.

They each agreed that it’s always about the data. (Of course it’s about the data.!) However, instead of thinking about the vast volumes of generated data (which has doubled in the last 3-5 years!), think about how best to filter that data so that it’s immediately relevant, as defined by individual users.

In the context of smart cities and smart buildings, remember that we are talking about 1) physical hardware – from networks to computers to robotics and sensors – and 2) the data generated by all these physical elements (see above), and then 3) the leveraging of that data through software and integrated solutions so that we address specific customer and market needs. 

Below are several specific use cases.

  • Automobile manufacturers are becoming smart mobility partners as well. It’s not just about selling cars, it’s about providing an experience which keeps drivers and passengers connected and safe. 
  • Robotics solutions will help deliver goods to the last mile, within city infrastructure – both physical and digital (networks). 
  • Provide transit for the last mile in crowded cities – transit which is flexible, customizable and safe. 
  • Occupancy maps for buildings and more sophisticated lighting and heating options will optimize building efficiency. The technology is available for the most part, but the adoption may be slow.
  • Doors becoming sensors may help manage security and access into buildings.
  • Sophisticated cameras can help proactively target the type of outlying behaviors worthy of action, and quickly mobilize relevant authorities. 
  • Connecting inanimate objects with each other – car-to-car, car-to-building, sensor-to-building, etc., can help address specific communication and collaboration and safety goals. It will also generate huge volumes of data which need to be managed proactively.
  • Provide low-friction shared mobility in collaboration with local cities, businesses, citizens while also respecting the privacy and security of all participants. Then leveraging aggregated and anonymized data to better understand how we can anticipate and serve individuals, groups, etc., and better anticipate the motivations and behaviors of individuals. There are many business implications if this is done well. 

Below are thoughts on how generating relevant data will lead to new businesses and better business models.

  • With volumes of collected data, you can not just understand who’s going where when, but also look at the patterns of behavior and see what might be impacting specific behaviors. These ‘movement maps’ is machine learning at its finest!
  • The ability to dynamically filter data based on a multitude of factors will create endless business opportunities, especially if the same data set can serve many different niche customers, and deeply serve individual customers.
  • Understanding past behaviors and data, and also current patterns of behavior will help businesses better anticipate and address needs. The possibilities are endless.
  • Having a standard set of protocols and formats will help integrate and manage data. Collaboration needs to happen in order to set these standards.

The group shared some final thoughts in specific areas:

  • Personalization is key – how do you both provide exactly and specifically what someone wants while also dynamically serving everyone else and their specific needs?
  • Security is fundamental. 
  • Privacy is to always be respected. 
  • Collaboration between government authorities, businesses, investors, users, etc., is essential.

We concluded with many thoughts on the Circular Economy and asked ourselves how can we all do good – serving those with some basic human needs, while also doing well? What’s the business case for serving those with the basic needs and who will help bring everyone forward. We didn’t have an answer, but agreed with Margaret Mead. “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed, citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

Gifts for All Seasons

December 1, 2019 by

Gifts

It’s that time of year, when you’re wondering why time keeps passing so quickly, and wondering what you’re going to give and receive, and how you’re going to make time to get what everything done and make everyone on your list happy.!

Good luck with that. May this year of holiday hectic-ness bring you also these gifts – Gifts for All Seasons.

  1. May you have all the material comforts which position you to reach higher and be a better version of yourself.
  2. May you adopt that gracious and appreciative mindset, which helps you enjoy the little things in life.
  3. May each unexpected surprise lead to glorious new adventures and opportunities.
  4. May the gifts of joy and laughter pepper your day-to-day activities, today and every day.
  5. May you adopt an open and accepting perspective for those you love the most and bother you the most.
  6. May you ever choose the gift of continuous learning.
  7. May you achieve dreams beyond your imagination, more than you thought possible.
  8. May you gain acceptance for your own shortcomings, and others for theirs.
  9. May you be surrounded by those you love, and sometimes also by those who are hard-to-love.
  10. May you embrace the gift of hope when life proves itself most challenging.

Wishing everyone a Happy, Safe, Peaceful and Restful end-of-2019.

FemTech Opportunities and Challenges

November 25, 2019 by

FemTechPanel

FountainBlue produced an educational and thought-provoking FemTech Opportunities and Challenges program, in partnership with NEOME and hosted by Fenwick and West.

Thank you to our panelists, our presenting entrepreneurs, our hosts, our volunteers, and our attendees for their supporting in creating a powerhouse event, which covered everything from the market opportunity to the stories-from-the-trenches, from the funding details to the presenting companies with practical offerings in the market today. Below are some notes from the conversation.

It takes a village to put together such a powerhouse event, which covered everything from the market opportunity to the stories-from-the-trenches, from the funding details to the presenting companies with practical offerings in the market today.

Our attendees consistently remarked on the exceptional educational and practical value of the program, as well as the exceptional opportunity to meet each other and each of you. They each are thinking differently about the femtech opportunity and where they would each fit as entrepreneurs, as customers, as advocates, as professionals, as investors.

Below are some notes for your review and approval. Any comments are welcome.

We were fortunate to have such seasoned Femtech professionals on the panel, each speaking so authentically about the challenges they faced and the opportunities ahead around Femtech. 

We launched the program by defining the femtech market and the opportunities and challenges ahead. Our panelists consistently remarked on the collaboration which take place around femtech investment, and also exclaimed on the great need in the market, plus the innovations available to address the needs of female patients. 

We have obviously come far from the days decades ago when we knew so little about the female physiology, structure, biology – treating women like mini-men. But we have much farther to go to understand how to design and implement solutions which fully support the many opportunities around femtech.

Our panel agreed that many steps need to be taken to increase the number of start-ups and solutions.

  1. We need to increase the pipeline of men and women interested in learning the science and the technology and persistent enough to create solutions.
  2. We need to fund research around the many facets of femtech, prioritizing areas where there’s the greatest need, so that you can serve more people, and increase the likelihood of having a viable company.
  3. We need to translate the research into practical applications which can go to market, in a way which is practical, sustainable, affordable.
  4. We need to build companies and market these solutions – prove that there’s a market that’s willing to pay the price to sustain the company.
  5. We need to finance the companies which have proven there’s a viable and expanding market for the offering.
  6. Companies which are receiving funding need to execute on their plan and scale the operations which bring in the margins expected by investors, while also delivering the value demanded by their customers.
  7. Once the company is scaling and profitable and growing, and when it makes sense, successful exits will help bring further interest, further energy, further funding into the Femtech market.

Any of the steps above invite further collaboration. Any of our panelists and their organizations and peers would help leaders and companies and investors better contribute to femtech solutions at all levels.

We each applauded our presenting entrepreneurs offered us glimpses into the wide breadth of opportunities around FemTech. Please approach them directly for further information about how you can support their company as an investor, as an ambassador, as a contributor. 

The bottom line is that there’s an ecosystem of players, and we ALL need to support and encourage, through education and mentoring, scientists, especially women, so they can 1) conduct the research 2) translate that research into patents, and then 3) further help them envision, create and execute those patents into fundable companies.

We hope that this event helped you better understand this emerging business opportunity, and that you become more interested in participating in this Sheconomy, focusing on Femtech solutions and opportunities – in collaboration with the full ecosystem, to deliver tangible and immediate results.

AllFemTechSpeakers


Thursday, November 21, 5:30-8:00 p.m.

Location: Fenwick and West, 600 Castro Street, Mountain View

FemTech Opportunities and Challenges

See invitation and bios by visiting https://www.tikkl.com/fountainblue/c/worldchangers

Feminine health issues around everything from fertility to menstruation, from reproductive health to sexual wellness have arisen over the centuries. But in this age of information, the solutions involve integrated software and devices solutions which provide diagnostic and even curative support for female patients. 

Our panel of activists and investors will profile the opportunities and challenges around FemTech and make predictions on what’s working now, what will work in the near future, plus advise us on how we can better collaborate to anticipate and address market needs.

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue
  • Panelist Anula Jayasuriya, Founder and Managing Director, EXXclaim Capital
  • Panelist Dr. Mitzi Krockover, Managing Director and Co-Chair Health Sector Committee, Golden Seed
  • Panelist Nola E Masterson, Board Member, Professor, and Lead Investor in Portfolia FemTech Fund 
  • Panelist Einat Meisel, Partner, Head of Israel Practice, Fenwick & West
  • with Keynote created by Reenita Das, SVP Healthcare, Frost and Sullivan

To wrap up the panel discussion, we will also profile several emerging femtech entrepreneurs for three minute presentations with three minutes of Q&A. Presenting Entrepreneurs included: 

  • Robert A. Feldman PhD, President and CEO, Prime Genomics, Inc
  • Tracy MacNeal, President & CEO, Materna Medical 
  • Greta Meyer, co-founder and CEO, Tempo 
  • Claire Thomas, Founder and CEO, Tua Fertility  
  • Soody Tronson, Founder and CEO, Presque