Archive for the ‘When She Speaks’ Category

What He Said, What He Meant

May 8, 2020

FountainBlue’s May 8 When She Speaks event on the topic of ‘What He Said, What He Meant’.  

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Our panelists represented a broad range of backgrounds and roles, but they had much in common:

  • They shared a passion for growing people and companies.
  • They work with leaders and managers to create a culture which is vibrant, inclusive, and growth-oriented.
  • They think deeply about human and business issues, and solve problems big and small, focusing on creating meaningful, strategic outcomes.

Below are some of their suggestions for improving communications between men and women in the workplace.

  • Be straightforward, direct, structured and specific in communication with men, especially if they are engineers.
  • Speak to the problem statement rather than the emotions.
  • Be plan-ful, have an agenda, know what you’d like to accomplish and why it must be done.
  • Own any communication challenges or hurdles. Address any confusion directly, immediately, calmly, respectfully.
  • Do well by others, for others, and help them to spread the word about how and why to work with yourself or your team.
  • Be specific with an ask, and clear on why you’re asking for something, what’s in it for others, what success looks like.
  • Welcome all dimensions of diversity – not just race and gender and age, but also disability, child-status, culture, etc.,
  • Know your audience – not all men, not all people are built the same. What are their motivations? 
  • Prove and know your value, your worth, then communicate this with confidence.
  • Be confident in your communications, comfortable in your own value, your own skin.

In closing, our panelists recommend that you be the type of leader who:

  • invests in relationships and people, focusing on the needs of each individual;
  • helps get teams and leaders productive and un-stuck;
  • facilitates forward momentum, forward movement;
  • is a community organizer, standing for the individual and the team and the organization;
  • is vulnerable and authentic and a good story-teller; and
  • embraces a larger vision, acts with high-integrity, focuses on continuous learning and collaboration.

Resource:

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Please join me in thanking our hosts at Oracle and our panelists for FountainBlue’s May 8 When She Speaks event on the topic of ‘What He Said, What He Meant’:

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue
  • Panelist Marilyn Becker, Senior Director, People Analytics, Western Digital
  • Panelist Carina Fang, Director, Program Management IoT Division, Synaptics 
  • Panelist Regina Lawless, Global Director, Diversity, Equality & Inclusion, Micron Technology 
  • Panelist David Ortiz, Senior Diversity and Inclusion Consultant, Oracle 
  • Panelist Stacey Porter, VP of People Operations and Strategy, Outset Medical Inc.

People-First Mindset

April 10, 2020

PeopleFirstMindset

FountainBlue’s April 10 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘A People-First Mindset’.  Our panelists represented a wide range of perspectives, roles and backgrounds, but consistently thought about, spoke to and acted on the people-first mindset in their teams, in their companies, in their lives.

Below is a compilation of best practices for putting people first, as advocated by our panelists.

Be Strategic

  • Be fact-based when making decisions, but always make decisions framed by the impact on the people.
  • Understand how everyone fits into the ecosystem, and also what motivates everyone and what success looks like. Then work together to provide the resources and support so that people will succeed.
  • Align the thinking, speaking and actions around putting people first, last and always. Do it from the top down, and also from the bottom up.
  • Provide the team with the information and resources to make informed decisions. Support them through tough changes, including the COVID-19 pandemic.

Be Empowering

  • Empower everyone to have a voice, to have influence, no matter where they are sitting at the table.
  • Focus not just on what you do, but on how the thinking, words and actions make people feel. 
  • Don’t just look at the bottom line results. Look also at how those results were delivered and the cost to the people. If the people cost is too high, the results may not be sustainable.
  • Celebrate and highlight successes. 
  • Make the opportunity to be your authentic self. Welcome others to do the same.
  • Invest in the front-line leaders who are your interface to customers and partners.
  • Practice deep listening so that you can better understand someone else and learn from them.

Choose Direct and Positive Communication

  • Err on the side of transparent, efficient communications which builds connection, trust and empathy.
  • Working with people is not always easy, but if you deliver a tough message in an unemotional way, and provide a specific way to improve, you can help them understand that you are still putting them first.

Keep Raising the Bar

  • Remember that without people, we have nothing. So rise above the ‘I’ – there is no ‘i’ in team. 
  • Move with agility to embrace new ways to show people they matter.
  • Establish guardrails to facilitate brainstorming, and encourage everyone to think outside the box and welcome new and different perspectives.
  • Know your walking point if you reach a scenario, team or company which does not value having a people first mindset.
  • Incentivize managers and leaders to grow themselves and their teams.
  • Embrace fail-fast mechanisms so that you can quickly learn from successes and mistakes.
  • Keep asking the ‘why’ questions until you deeply understand perspectives and motivations.
  • Choose to experience and do something a little bit differently.

The bottom line is that putting people first is something you think about, speak to, act on – all the time, every time. Doing this well is contagious and will spreads well to all you touch.

Notes are available online at  and bios are online at https://www.tikkl.com/fountainblue/c/people


Please join me in thanking our panelists for FountainBlue’s April 10 When She Speaks event on the topic of ‘A People-First Mindset’ and our hosts at Maxim.

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue 
  • Panelist Sharawn Connors, VP, Diversity, Equality & Inclusion, Micron
  • Panelist Rita DeStaso, Services Account Executive, Strategic Enterprise, Microsoft
  • Panelist Monica Kaldani-Nasif, Chief People Officer, Kateeva
  • Panelist Tracy Laboy, Executive Director of Human Resources, Maxim

Overcoming Imposter’s Syndrome

March 13, 2020

ImposterSyndromePanelMarch2020

FountainBlue’s March 13 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘Overcoming Imposter Syndrome’. Our panelists loosely defined ‘Imposter Syndrome’ as the delta between what you think you’ve done and how it matches with the expectations of yourself and others, and the resultant anxiety associated with any mis-match.

The panelists brought up that many people experience Imposter Syndrome, that many women do, even accomplished women, but it’s also not just a woman’s thing, and it’s not just also for tech professionals as wives or husbands and athletes might experience it too. 

Our amazing panelists had experienced imposter syndrome at various points in their very impressive careers, especially as they were just starting out in a new field, role or industry.

Below are some of their suggestions and advice for how to navigate imposter syndrome.

  • Be data-based rather than emotive. 
  • Know the facts, be prepared, do the things you need to do to succeed.
  • Recruit and nurture advocates, sponsors and mentors. Ask people to be sounding boards. Build teams and communities.
  • Say yes to opportunities, even when they stretch your abilities and make you feel uncomfortable.
  • Be confident enough to try something new, open enough to seek input and guidance in that new role, and persistent and hard working enough to perform well in that new capacity.
  • Own your plan for success. If you’d like to be promoted, make sure that you backfill for your position, and can prove that you’re ready for that next position.
  • Be positive and supportive to others. Support them in their challenges and ask for help with your own.
  • Don’t expect to know it all, but do ask relevant questions that make people think.
  • Select a manager who is supportive and has your best interest in mind.
  • Tell a story to communicate your point: the message, the data, the conclusion.
  • Remember that you are not alone. Even people you think are very accomplished may not be as confident as you think. 
  • Adopt an ecosystem view to understand complex issues. There are many layers of people and issues involved in any one decision.
  • Adopt a thinking rather than an emotional approach to a career question or issue.
  • When you need to, fake it until you make it. Be confident.
  • Be curious.

Be encouraging and positive about what you do, and supportive even when things don’t go as planned. Proactively and positively manage that voice in your head.


Please join me in thanking our panelists for FountainBlue’s March 13 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘Overcoming Imposter Syndrome’.

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue
  • Panelist Jane Divinski, serial entrepreneur and engineering leader
  • Panelist Joyce Eng, Senior Director, Strategy, Program Management, User Experience, Roche

  • Panelist Krista Pavlakos, Senior Director, Marketing Communications & Demand Creation, Renesas Electronics
  • Panelist Lori Kate Smith, former Director, Marketing Programs, Machine Learning (ML), ARM

One Plus One Makes Eleven

February 15, 2020

OnePlusOnePanelFountainBlue’s February 13 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘One Plus One Makes Eleven’. This month’s inspiring panel of leaders came from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences, but they had much in common.

  • They are clear and inspiring communicators who are both humble and confident.
  • They have navigated some challenging waters, and learned from both their successes and their challenges.
  • They continue to push the envelop, holding the bar higher for themselves and for all those they work with.

They also agreed on many things.

  • Empowering the people and the team is a critical management and leadership skill. 
  • The only way for individuals and teams to scale is to include a broader, more diverse team members.
  • It’s not always easy to integrate someone into a team, but it’s often worth the effort to try. Build rapport with each team member.

They also shared advice on how to get teams to be more innovative.

  • Create and nurture a culture which rewards failure, which invites courage.
  • Invite the multipliers to join the team. 
  • Inspire and engage the right people to join and stay. 
  • Embrace a collaboration mind set – 
  • Be ever ready to answer the questions: how are we better together? how are we making a difference?
  • Celebrate the wins.
  • Err on the side of inclusivity.
  • Decide for yourself what types of people would ‘push your buttons’. Find out how to best manage yourself, and best work with people who might be toxic or difficult under specific circumstances.
  • Be customer-oriented and motivate the team to also focus on the customer.
  • Be metrics/data-based, especially when emotions run high.

We close by challenging everyone to be the leader, be the change. Never settle into complacency. Celebrate successes, but then be passionate about what’s next.


FountainBlue’s February 13 When She Speaks event on the topic of ‘One Plus One Makes Eleven’. Please join me in thanking our panelists and our hosts at Citrix.

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue
  • Panelist Indira Joshi, Director of Technical Marketing, Emerging Memory Solutions, Micron Technology
  • Panelist Shikha Mittal, Director, Product Management & Strategy, VMware
  • Panelist Marissa Schmidt, Senior Director of Product Management, CITRIX

A Seat at the Table

January 20, 2020

SeatAtTablePanelFountainBlue’s January 18 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘A Seat at the Table’.  Although this month’s panelists had a wide range of styles, perspectives and backgrounds, they have each certainly earned their seats at the table. Below is a compilation of their advice on how we could each also earn the respect, influence and resources needed to make a strategic and tactical impact at work and in life.

  • Be Brave.
    • If you want to make a difference and experience something different than what you’ve experienced to date, be courageous in making well-thought-out, uncomfortable choices.
  • Be Calm.
    • Manage your own emotions so that you can have more influence. When emotions run high, try to assume positive intent and understand the motivations and actions of people who are making you upset. 
  • Be Prepared.
    • Think strategically and tactically about what you’d like to accomplish and why, who can help make it happen, how it could happen, what success looks like, etc. 
  • Be Authentic.
    • Be fully and genuinely and openly authentic, truthful, compassionate and human. This is especially true through tough circumstances.
  • Be Connected.
    • Grow your personal and professional network to include a wider and broader swath of people.  
  • Be Empathetic.
    • Be open and empathetic, more curious than judgmental about people who are not-like-you. 
  • Be Collaborative.
    • Partner and work with like-minded people to achieve results which benefit all.
  • Be Charming.
    • Honey attracts flies better than vinegar. Never underestimate the power of charm. 
  • Be Strategic.
    • When making decisions, consider the why, the what, the who, the how and achieve those long-term and short term goals. 
  • Be Effective.
    • Know what success looks like and measure and report on your progress along the way, engaging all stakeholders.
  • Be Creative.
    • Embrace your ability to think outside the box. Welcome others to also voice diverse perspectives.
  • Be Compassionate.
    • Be gentle with yourself and others. We are all one, on an imperfect journey to finding our greater selves.
  • Be Positive.
    • Manage your self-talk and your energy to think and act positively.

The bottom line is that we can each earn a seat at the table, no matter what our background, role, education, etc., If you choose to have a seat at the table, first ask yourself WHY you’d like to do it, WHAT you’d like to influence first, WHO can help you to do so, and WHAT success would look like.

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FountainBlue’s January 18 When She Speaks event on the topic of ‘A Seat at the Table’. Please join me in thanking our panelists and our hosts at TechLAB.

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue
  • Panelist Coco Brown, Founder and CEO, The Athena Alliance
  • Panelist Barbara Massa, Executive Vice President, People & Places, FireEye
  • Panelist Nivedita Ojha, Senior Director – Product Management, Edge Devices & Cloud, Mobile, SaaS, Citrix
  • Panelist Sonya Pelia, CMO, Cira Apps Ltd; Board Member, How Women Lead
  • Panelist Ronit Polak, VP Quality Assurance, Palo Alto Networks

Men Who Open Doors

December 20, 2019

MenOpenDoors.jpg

FountainBlue’s December 13 When She Speaks event was on the topic of Men Who Open Doors.  This month’s panelists represented a wide range of companies, backgrounds and roles, but they had much in common which made them great sponsors.

  • They consistently and strategically sponsor the women in their organization because they believe in the business, professional and personal benefits for doing so
  • They have success stories which show how sponsorship has benefited individuals, teams, and organizations.
  • They support and espouse a culture of inclusive beyond the people they can personally sponsor.

Below is advice they shared about how to sponsor a promising staff member.

  • Doing the right thing by someone and supporting their advancement is also good for your culture, your product, your company.
  • Be an empathetic and proactive listener. 
  • Help someone clarify their passion, and create a path to work on something of interest to her/him.
  • Have a merit-based view of the world.
  • See others without the filter of judgment. 
  • Learn from everyone, no matter what their role is, what their organization is.
  • Invite diverse perspectives to support everything from product development to decision-making, from hiring to marketing.
  • Encourage people to stop complaining and start doing something. Empower them to succeed.
  • Allow access to key leaders and customers so that they can see the larger perspective. 
  • Give them opportunities to prove themselves, to shine and thrive.
  • Help people gain the self confidence to reach beyond their comfort zone.

Below is advice for people who are seeking sponsors.

  • Be strategic about what you’re looking for, who can help you, how she/he can help you.
  • Know that not all sponsors are the right ones for you, and even that not all sponsors are good sponsors.
  • Be clear on your interests and your passion, and how these things can benefit the product, the group, the organization.
  • Be willing to work hard, to learn to think, speak and act differently.
  • Embrace feedback and input.
  • Be open minded about available options.

Below is advice on how we can help each other move the needle forward.

  • Help and support others, even if it’s not your job to do so.
  • Choose to do the right thing, and help others to do the same.
  • Have an abundance mindset – the more you help someone else – even if that person is not directly related to you – the more you help everyone.
  • Help someone find his or her voice.
  • Make a stand for someone whose not acknowledged.
  • Defend someone from the games others are playing to undermine her/him.

The bottom line with these sponsors is that they whole-heartedly believe that together with a more diverse, more inclusive team, we are ALL better off, in the short term and for the long term.


Please join me in thanking our panelists and our hosts at Texas Instruments.

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue; Director, Vonzos Partners
  • Panelist Dr. Benjamin Cook, Sr. Director, Nanotechnology – Kilby Labs, CTO Organization, Texas Instruments
  • Panelist JD Dillon, Vice President of Marketing, Enphase Energy
  • Panelist Martin Jessen, VP Learning Solutions North America, Schneider Electric
  • Panelist Mike Snell, Vice President of Operations, Global Operations, Lam Research
  • Panelist Jon Woolvine, Distinguished Engineer, Director Information Technology, Cisco 
  • with opening remarks provided by Rajni Dharmarajan, Product line General Manager, Texas Instruments

Unconscious Bias

November 11, 2019
UnconsciousBias

Left to Right: Sonya, Megan, Martha, Linda, Alia, Sujatha

FountainBlue’s November 8 When She Speaks event on the topic of Overcoming Unconscious Bias. Our panelists represented a wide range of perspectives and backgrounds, yet they had much in common.

  • Each are intelligent, driven, flexible and competent enough to excel in a corporate environment while remaining business-focused and people-centric.
  • Each are committed to sharing their best practices, in the interest of supporting the larger community.
  • Each has the self-awareness and confidence to address and confront their own unconscious biases, and stoically plod on the self-improvement journey, while supporting others with theirs.

They shared their advice with wisdom, insight and humor.

  • Be slow to judge, quick to support.
  • Be actively thinking, actively listening to what’s said and what’s meant.
  • Look closely, judge kindly.
  • Reflection and introspection help people get grounded and centered.
  • Take all the help you can get to manage your own unconscious biases – whether it’s through your company, your trusted board of advisers, your school and community, etc.,
  • Choose to be the bigger person when you are the one being judged. Consistently build that brand of taking the high road. Deliver with your results.
  • Recruit others to support you in overcoming biases, conscious and conscious.
  • Watch your language. Manage your filters. 
  • Pick your battles. Address the mid-term and long-term goals. The short term battles are difficult to win, especially when the biases aren’t conscious, when the judgements run deep.
  • Know what you can influence and what you can’t influence. Accept what you can’t influence – (at least not in the short term.)
  • Watch the packaging – how you dress, look and act may have others judging you favorably or unfavorably. Aim not to offend.
  • Have honest conversations with yourself about any biases you might have.
  • Immerse yourself in uncomfortable situations and circumstances so that you can better understand those who are not-like-you.
  • Spell out how others are categorized and considered for hiring and promotion. Is it fair and just? Is it generating the diverse results you say you’re seeking?
  • Create processes which would help others fairly consider all options.
  • Watch the exceptions that you’re making, to ensure that those exceptions are fairly distributed.

In the end, we concluded that it’s hard to be open to your own biases when you don’t know that you have them, or what they are. Assume that you do. That everyone does.

You can only manage your own journey, and support others as they manage theirs.


Please join me in thanking our panelists for FountainBlue’s November 8 When She Speaks event on the topic of Overcoming Unconscious Bias and our gracious hosts at Aruba HPE.

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue 
  • Panelist Alia Ayub, Vice President of Tax, Lam Research
  • Panelist Megan Cheek, Head of Human Resources, Anatomage
  • Panelist Sujatha Mandava, VP of Product Management, Aruba HPE
  • Panelist Sonya Pelia, CMO, Cira Apps Limited
  • Panelist Martha Ryan, Executive Director Business Transformation, Maxim

Mentorship

November 11, 2019
Mentorship2019HonoreesFountainBlue’s First Annual Mentorship Awards event, part of the When She Speaks series, was scheduled for November 1.
Our mentorship awardees this year had a wide range of backgrounds and experiences, but each had much in common:
  • they each valued the input of the mentors from an early age and on an ongoing basis;
  • they worked with their companies to create a program which support dozens and even hundreds of men and women;
  • they each continued to mentor others as they themselves advanced in their careers;
  • they are each committed to continuing to mentor others, on top of their immense work responsibilities, community commitments, and the day-to-day joys and challenges of a busy family.
Our panelists agreed on the short term and long-term benefits of mentorship. Mentors can help solve current problems, but they can also help with longer-term gains building confidence, expanding perception, providing support, especially when times are tough.
 
There are many reasons to become a mentor. Not only is it personally satisfying, but also supports the professional development of mentees, but also the team and organization as a whole. Mentoring is a great way to give back – to your team, to your company, to your community, to the next generation. 
 
Below is a summary of mentorship best practices.
  • The mentoring relationship is a dynamic one – the needs of both mentors and mentees change over time. Clear communication from both sides help ensure productive interactions between mentees and mentors.
  • One goal from a mentorship relationship is to develop a ‘thicker skin’, so that the mentee is more resilient and confident even if an environment is less than ideal.
  • Mentors can successfully mirror behavior or attitude of the mentee, so that she/he can better understand how others are responding to them.
  • There are many different kinds of mentors and mentoring relationships. Just because you have a technical mentor doesn’t mean that you don’t also need a mentor to help navigate a new role, for example.
  • Mentors can help filter messages and information, so that you focus on what’s important and use your time most wisely.
  • Mentor people at all levels, not just those designated as ‘high-potential’. Even if the mentee never gets into management levels, that mentee would have more influence and more confidence in whichever level they’re in.
  • With that said, make sure that both mentors and mentees are willing participant. It doesn’t work to mandate a mentor-mentee relationship.
  • Have specific criteria if you’re matching mentors and mentees, and have direct communication to ensure that both parties continue to benefit from the connection.
Every speaker remarked on how important it was to develop our people, our relationships, and how mentorship is a critical tool to grow everyone at all levels at scale.

Please join me in congratulating FountainBlue’s 2019 Mentorship Honorees.
  • Amber Barber, Sr. Manager Business Operations Management, Lam Research
  • Serpil Bayraktar, Distinguished Engineer, Chief Architect’s Office – Development, Cisco
  • Christina Lewis, BU Controller/Director, Enterprise Finance, Western Digital
  • Ronit Polak, VP, Quality Assurance, Palo Alto Networks
  • Kavita Shah, Senior Director, Strategic Marketing, Nova Measuring Instruments
Thank you also to our hosts at Lam Research, to Erin Yeaman, Managing Director of HR, Lam Research and to Mike Snell, Vice President of Operations, Global Operations, Lam Research for their introductory remarks. 

Age of the Customer

October 14, 2019

FountainBlue’s October 11 When She Speaks event was on the topic of ‘Age of the Customer’. Below are notes from the conversation.

We were fortunate to have such a fun, passionate, customer-focused panel to speak on this ‘Age of the Customer’ topic. Clearly their focus on the customer helps them better understand the needs and motivations of internal and external customers. The far-ranging conversation covered the drivers which lead to the empowerment of the customer, including the infrastructure development and technology advancement which influenced this trend:

  • The hardware and software advancements 
  • The networking and bandwidth advancements 
  • The big data, AI, database advancements
  • The sensors, IoT, and other data-generating devices and things

Indeed, the world has become more connected, the customers more empowered. Our panelists agreed that the challenge now is not getting the data, but filtering the data for relevancy; not retrieving the data, but how quickly we can get access to the right data; not creating simple if-then scripts around the data, but creating and continually updating programs to proactive receive and act on relevant data, so we can make real-time inferences and decisions, sometimes when the stakes are very high.

In this age of the customer, proactive companies:

  • invite customers to provide input on current and anticipated problems 
  • integrate historical, customer and market data to better anticipate future needs
  • synthesize data to add strategic value for each customer
  • help internal and external customers better navigate changes in market and technology trends

Below is advice provided by our panelists on how to better serve customers:

  • Be proactive. Err on the side of action. 
  • Don’t let ‘best’ be the enemy of ‘better’. 
  • Align stakeholders on a common cause – the needs of the customer.
  • Be fluid, be open. Don’t be complacent.
  • Invite the feedback and participation from the naysayers.
  • Believe in yourself.
  • Be persistent – go over, go around, go through if you must.
  • Build communities.
  • Build relationships.
  • Leverage data and metrics to better understand and address the needs of the customer. 
  • Embrace failure as a lesson in succeeding. But if you must fail, fail fast. Don’t hang on to long to something that will fail. 

We concluded by remarking that serving customers will be more efficient, even as customers becoming more demanding for personalized solutions. So automation, ingenuity and programming will be key. However, humans will always be necessary. There will be no substitute for the human connection. Humans will always be needed to make those decisions, to solve for new problems, to come up with those creative solutions, in this age of the customer.


Please join us in thanking our panelists for FountainBlue’s October 11 When She Speaks event, on the topic of ‘Age of the Customer’ and our gracious hosts at Pure Storage.

  • Facilitator Linda Holroyd, CEO, FountainBlue 
  • Panelist Donelle Block, Director, Global Support Operations, Pure Storage, Inc.
  • Panelist Lauren Larson Diehl, Sr. Director, Customer Success Management Global Program Office, Oracle
  • Panelist Shikha Mittal, Director, Product Management & Strategy, VMWare 
  • Panelist Meena Narayanan, Vice President – People & Culture, Livongo Health
  • with opening remarks by Bill Cerreta, General Manager, Platform BU, Pure Storage

See bios and invitation at https://www.tikkl.com/fountainblue/c/collaboration

Collaboration

September 25, 2019

CollaborationBestPracticesPanel

We were fortunate to have such a diverse, inspiring and experienced panel of leaders speaking on a range of collaboration concepts. They represented a range of educational backgrounds, corporate experience, and cultural and entrepreneurial backgrounds, but they had much in common.

  • They each leveraged collaboration to bring out the best in themselves and in others. 
  • They are each experts at drawing on the experience and backgrounds and perspectives of others, while focusing on common issues and problems.
  • They are each passionate about learning and growing, and committed to spreading their learnings to others.

Below are some thoughts they shared about the benefits of collaboration:

  • Collaborating with others leads to greater results for all.
  • Collaborating with others who are different than you brings great value still.
  • Business issues ranging from problem-solving to decision-making, from brainstorming to conflict resolution can be resolved through collaboration.

Each panelist emphasized that leaders who can best facilitate collaboration will consistently bring better results. Below is some advice on how to better encourage collaboration.

  • Understand the background and motivations of others, so that you can better work towards a common goal.
  • Identify criteria and factors of importance for a project’s success.
  • Ensure that the data you use is valid and true. That data’s integrity is critical to the success of any project.
  • Larger networks are not necessarily better, but more diverse networks generally can be better. So encourage diversity of thought in your team, for your projects, in your life.
  • Be inclusive of others. Help others feel comfortable contributing.
  • Focus on the needs of the customer. Ask your internal staff, your partners and your customers how you can best serve their needs.
  • Clear, transparent, true communication is critical for all effective collaborations. 
  • All successful collaborations rely on mutual trust.

Here are some final thoughts around collaboration.

  • Be humble. Be open. Be a lifelong learner who believes you can learn from anyone, from every experience.
  • Have a good attitude. Your Attitude and Your Aptitude will define your Altitude.
  • Empathy is the new superpower. Be empathetic to those around you. Understanding everyone’s point of view, and having compassion for their pain-points and challenges will help you better understand yourself and your project.

Resources: